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April 2017
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Books

Cover for You Don't Look Like Your Picture
You Don't Look Like Your Picture
Stories of Love in the Digital Age
Multiple Authors
Six writers explore the ways our digital obsessions change the way we love. Bestselling novelists are paired with exciting new voices for a read that moves between domestic tragedy and sexy satire, international revenge plots and fantasies not even big enough for two.
Why We Love It
What we love about this bundle, aside from each and every story, is that approaches the question at its core – has human connection really changed? – from every conceivable angle. There is humor, there is pathos, there is weird, sexy sci-fi, and there is deep existential dread. There are zero answers of course; this is fiction. But we found ourselves tripping over new insights on every page.

Adam Haslett takes us on an OKCupid hookup that becomes a missed connection even while it's happening. Tova Mirvis lets us peek into an adulterous affair in the age of NSA wiretaps. Namwali Serpell shows us how a couple’s quest for ever-safer sex leads to a near-fatal love triangle and Vanessa Hua brings us inside a Hong Kong sex scandal. In Deni Béchard's "Kali Yuga" two-half brothers search for meaning in their conceptions of one another and in Justin Keenan's "Love on Mars" two twenty-somethings dead-ending in Kentucky just search, period, without knowing what they're looking for.
Cover for Frankenstein
Frankenstein
or, The Modern Prometheus
Mary Shelley
A brilliant young doctor discovers the secret of animating life and creates a monster out of dead body parts, without thinking what place such a creature might have in society. Lonely and unloved, the creature turns on his creator and wreaks a vengeance at once gruesome and all too understandable.
Why We Love It
We couldn't resist pairing You Don't Look Like Your Picture with this classic, which couldn't have a dimmer view of the tension between technological advances and the human need to connect.

It's a book everyone knows but surprisingly few have read, which is too bad because it's about as much fun as a book can be while also being ridiculously sad and, frankly, terrifying. (It's known as the first great horror story for a reason.)